In all the excitement of Namine’s fever and trips to the doctor and hospital, I forgot to tell you about this: Namine went on the potty a couple days ago. It was pretty momentous, even if, so far, it’s only a single occurrence. But the fact that it happened at all – and how it happened – may, just may, indicate something much larger. Possibly something yet again doctor-defying, even.

Lately, Namine has been telling us, and pretty reliably, when she needs to be changed. Sometimes she’ll tug on her diaper, but she’ll always say “Ayn!” (Change!) Well, the other day, she told Jessica that she needed to be changed. When she put Namine up on the changing table, though, her diaper was dry. Then it occurred to her to ask, “Namine, do you want to use the potty?”

“Uh huh!”

So she took Namine into the bathroom and put her on the potty. (We have a training potty that fits on top of the big people toilet.) Jessica tried the usual tricks – distraction (reading, storytelling, and singing) and running the water. No dice. Then Namine pointed to the door and said, “Oh!”

Jessica pointed to the door. “Do you want the door closed?”

“Uh huh.”

“Okay.” She closed the door and heard a slight tinkle. I’m quite sure that Namine smiled that big smile she gets when she’s especially proud of herself. As she should be.

It occurred to me, after Jessica told me about Namine going on the potty, that there have been a few times where Namine has been dry, even though she told me she needed to be changed. Well, now I’ll know for next time.

And the reason this is such a big deal to us, above and beyond the normal thrill any parent feels when their kid goes on the toilet, is because Namine has caudal regression syndrome. It’s very common for CRS patients to be incontinent, or to have other such problems. Even if Namine can’t hold it until she gets to a bathroom – and it’s much too early to know that, now – at least we know that she can tell when she needs to go. That’s promising.

Husband. Daddy. Programmer. Artist. I’m not an expert, I just play one in real life.